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The Clinical Effect with the Use of Gel Anesthesia within Gingival Sulcus during Scaling
J Dent Hyg Sci 2018;18:319-26
Published online October 31, 2018;  https://doi.org/10.17135/jdhs.2018.18.5.319
© 2018 Korean Society of Dental Hygiene Science.

Seong-Ok Park*, Ae-Jung Im*, Yong-Soon Ahn, Im-Hee Jung, Do-Seon Lim

Department of Dental Hygiene, Graduate School of Public Health Science, Eulji University, Seongnam 13135, Korea
Correspondence to: Do-Seon Lim
Department of Dental Hygiene, Graduate School of Public Health Science, Eulji University, 553 Sanseong-daero, Sujeong-gu, Seongnam 13135, Korea
Tel: +82-31-740-7229 , Fax: +82-31-740-7352, E-mail: idsun@eulji.ac.kr
ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-4602-3323
*These authors contributed equally to this work as first authors.
Received September 14, 2018; Revised September 30, 2018; Accepted October 1, 2018.
This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Abstract
Although scaling is the primary method for improving oral health, it is also associated with dental fear. The objective of this study was to empirically verify whether the use of gel anesthetic within the gingival sulcus during scaling relieves pain and improves other factors. A total of 128 patients scheduled to undergo scaling at a dental clinic of a general hospital located in the Gyeonggi Province, between July 2014 and July 2015, were enrolled in the study. The participants underwent scaling following the application of 20% benzocaine gel or placebo gel anesthetic within the gingival sulcus, and the data was collected using a questionnaire. There was a significant difference in the severity of pain, participant satisfaction, perceived sensitivity, overall discomfort, and fear of scaling between the two groups. The two groups were compared in terms of perceived need for gel anesthesia, willingness to pay for anesthesia costs, and willingness to receive scaling in the future. There were significant differences in all the three parameters depending on whether gel anesthesia was used or not. There were significant differences between the two groups in perceived sensitivity immediately after scaling and one day after scaling, with no difference seen one week after scaling. With regards to overall discomfort over time, there were significant differences between the two groups immediately after scaling. Based on these findings, we expect that application of gel anesthetic within the gingival sulcus during scaling will reduce pain, perceived sensitivity, overall discomfort, and fear of scaling with increased satisfaction.
Keywords : Anesthesia, Dental anxiety, Dental scaling, Hypersensitivity


October 2018, 18 (5)
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